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Rye High School 1 Parsons Street
Rye, NY 10580

Ph: 914.967.6100 ext: 1901

Please note that the District’s current website is undergoing major construction and will be completely updated very shortly. In the meantime, if the format of any material on the District’s current website interferes with your ability to access information and you require an accommodation, please contact Kaitlyn Sassone, Director of Technology, at 914-967-6100 x6211.  To enable us to respond in a manner most helpful to you, please indicate the nature of your accessibility problem, the preferred format in which to receive the material, the Web address of the requested material, and your contact information. Further, if you would like to file a complaint concerning the accessibility of the District’s website, information and a complaint form can be found here or you can contact Kaitlyn Sassone, Director of Technology, at 914-967-6100 for further information. 
  English Department, Rye City School District  
 

Welcome to the English Department webpage. On this page, you will find links to assignments and resources. If you have any questions regarding the English curriculum or instruction, please do not hesitate to contact me. 

Christen Klewicki
ELA Department Coordinator, 6-12
Rye City School District
                                                                                                                   

                                                                 klewicki.christen@ryeschools.org


Dear Rye High School Students, Parents, and Guardians,

 

Summer vacation is a perfect  time to read wonderful books.  The English Department has compiled a list of summer reading books to represent a variety of genres and interests; please review the list below.  All high school students must select and read one book from the school-wide summer reading list.  Our goal is to encourage students to become lifelong readers—we anticipate lively literary discussions in the fall.  In September, students will evaluate their summer reading books and participate in discussions within their classrooms about the various books.

 

Students electing AP English Literature and Composition, AP English Language and Composition, and Honors English classes must read and complete assignments for their respective classes in addition to reading a book from the school-wide list.  The additional books for advanced English students are listed below as well; links to assignments for advanced English students are also included below.  

 

We hope all students and families enjoy their summer reading books!

 

Sincerely,

The Rye High School English Department

 
 
   

School-Wide Summer Reading Book Titles

Authors

Nonfiction

 

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking

Susan Cain

Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life

William Deresiewicz

S.O.B.E.R.

A Story of Addiction Told by a Mother and Her Son

Anita Baglaneas Devlin and Michael Devlin Jr.

How Starbucks Saved My Life: A Son of Privilege Learns to Live Like Everyone Else

Michael Gates Gill

Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America

Jill Leovy

Valiant Ambition:  George Washington, Benedict Arnold,  and the Fate of the American Revolution

Nathaniel Philbrick

Outcasts United: A Refugee Team, an American Town, and One Woman’s Quest To Make a Difference

Warren St. John

Fiction

 

Mosquitoland

David Arnold

Armada

Ernest Cline

Wool

Hugh Howey

The Nightingale

Kristin Hannah

Calvin

Martine Leavitt

Girl at War

Sara Novic

East of Eden

John Steinbeck

 


Students enrolled in Honors or AP courses:

In addition to one book from the school-wide reading list above, read the assigned book(s) for your specific class as noted below.  Also complete the assignments for your class posted on the Rye High School Guidance page.

Course/Level Fall 2016

Title

Author

9th Grade Honors

The Book Thief

Markus Zusak

10th Grade Honors

The Nightingale

Kristin Hannah

11th Grade Honors

The Invention of Wings

Sue Monk Kidd

AP English Language

1. On Writing

Stephen King

 

2.  A selection of five short essays from The New York Times Magazine

 

AP English Literature

1.  The Power and the Glory

Graham Greene

 

2.  Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen


Books are a uniquely portable magic.   — Stephen King
 
 
     

Please access the following link to the Rye High School Guidance Department to locate the Rye High School Summer Reading Assignments for AP Lit, AP Lang, 9 Honors, 10 Honors, 11 Honors:  
http://guidance.ryecityschools.rhs.schoolfusion.us/modules/locker/files/group_files.phtml?
parent=28640036&gid=804503&sessionid=590b57af53bbc0bd998452cc7faced1d


 

The 9th Grade Honors Summer Reading Assignment is also posted below:

 

Assignment for The Book Thief by Markus Zusak.  

 

Read pages 3 to 204.          Select one passage from this page range to annotate.

 

Read pages 205 to 324.      Select a second passage from this page range to annotate.

 

Read pages 325 to 451.      Select a third passage taken from this page range to annotate.    

__________________________________________________________________________

 

You are responsible for turning in three annotated passages on the day of your in-class assessment.

 

How to complete an annotation:

 
  • Choose a passage from the book that you find meaningful. This passage should be at least one paragraph, but no more than one page.  Type or photocopy the passage.  Make sure to include the page number on which the passage can be found.

 
  • Each passage that you choose to annotate should focus on one particular main character: Liesel, Rudy, Hans, or Rosa. Stay with the same character for each of your three annotations so that you develop a deep understanding of this character.  

 
  • When you complete an annotation, you are essentially writing down the insights, ideas, and questions that you have about the passage as you read it.  You begin by underlining interesting words, phrases, and lines, but then you must include your ideas about these underlined sections.  These ideas, insights, and questions are written in the margins around the text to show what you are thinking and understanding about the character and text as you are reading.

 
  • Annotations taken from outside the designated page range for the particular assignment will not be accepted.

 

Here are some questions to answer as you annotate your passage:

 
  • What specific adjectives would you use to describe the personality of your chosen character as it is revealed in the passage? Why?

  • What motivates the character to act as he or she does in the scene?

  • What does the passage reveal about the character’s conflict?

  • What words/phrases in the passage seem most important? Why?

  • How does the passage connect to the larger ideas of the book as a whole?

  • What questions do you have when you read the passage? Can you begin to answer some of these questions?





 

 

 

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